Gloria Lynne, "Soul Serenade" Promo LP (1965). Front cover image. Mono. R&B, soul, and jazz, from the late great Gloria Lynne.
Gloria Lynne, "Soul Serenade" Promo LP (1965). Back cover image. Mono. R&B, soul, and jazz, from the late great Gloria Lynne.
Gloria Lynne, "Soul Serenade" Promo LP (1965). Inner Fontana sleeve, front, image. Mono. R&B, soul, and jazz, from the late great Gloria Lynne.
Gloria Lynne, "Soul Serenade" Promo LP (1965). Record label sticker image. Mono. R&B, soul, and jazz, from the late great Gloria Lynne.
Modern Soul Records

Gloria Lynne "Soul Serenade" Promo LP (1965)

Regular price $50.00 $0.00 Unit price per

Details: Rare used 12” promo record, soul album by jazz and soul singer Gloria Lynne who passed away at 83 in Newark, NJ in 2013. She was awarded various awards late in life, and the official “Gloria Lynne Day” is on June 25th in New York (it began in 1995). This is a Mono version of the album. Sadly, most of Gloria’s original work was destroyed (among many other artists) in a Universal lot fire in 2008. This alternate pressing still has an original Fontana inner sleeve. Features "Joey, Joey, Joey," and the fantastic track, "Soul Serenade."

The final track on Side A was originally written by Herbie Hancock. "Watermelon Man" has been recorded over 200 times. "Hancock wrote the piece to help sell his debut album as a leaderTakin' Off (1962), on Blue Note Records; it was the first piece of music he had ever composed with a commercial goal in mind. The popularity of the piece, due primarily to Mongo Santamaría, paid Hancock's bills for five or six years. Hancock did not feel the composition was a sellout however, describing that structurally, it was one of his strongest pieces due to its almost mathematical balance.

The form is a sixteen bar blues. Recalling the piece, Hancock said, "I remember the cry of the watermelon man making the rounds through the back streets and alleys of Chicago. The wheels of his wagon beat out the rhythm on the cobblestones." The tune, based on a bluesy piano riff, drew on elements of R&B, soul-jazz, and bebop, all combined into a pop hook. Hancock joined bassist Butch Warren and drummer Billy Higgins in the rhythm section, with Freddie Hubbard on trumpet and Dexter Gordon on tenor saxophone. Hancock's chordal work draws from the gospel tradition, while he builds his solo on repeated riffs and trilled figures."

Description: “In 1996, Lynne received the International Women of Jazz Award, and she was honored with a Pioneer Award by the Rhythm and Blues Foundation in 1997. Other awards and recognitions include the National Treasure Award from the Seasoned Citizens Theatre Company (2003); induction into the National Black Sports and Entertainment Hall of Fame; Living Legend Award from the State of Pennsylvania (2007). On May 6, 2008, Lynne was presented with a special award for "Outstanding Achievement In Jazz", at the New York MAC Awards. On October 22, 2010, she was honored at New York's Schomburg Library, for her many contributions to the music industry and the world by Great Women In Music and its founder Roz Nixon. Roz Nixon Entertainment worked successfully with Lynne throughout her final years, producing, co-producing, or participating in making the arrangements for Ms. Lynne's appearances pertaining to her last concerts or significant events.“

Grade: NM (cover/inner) / NM (record)

TRACK LISTING SIDE A:

  1. Soul Serenade

  2. That’s My Desire

  3. Baby Won’t You Please Come Home

  4. If I Loved You

  5. Don’t Go To Strangers

  6. Watermelon Man (Herbie Hancock)

TRACK LISTING SIDE B:

  1. Teach Me Tonight

  2. People Will Say We’re In Love

  3. All Alone

  4. I’ll Be Around

  5. Joey, Joey, Joey

  6. It Could Happen To You